Photobucket

Say, have you ever said to yourself "Gee, if only I could get my daily intake of Disney, American History, Doctor Who, Hetalia, Neopets, Once Upon a Time, politics, and all other sorts of nerdy fun all in one blog"? Then you have come to the right blog, my friend.

My name is Rachel, and I'm a teenage geek from Virginia who is far too obsessed with the American Revolution and likes things she probably should grown out of years ago. I also need to revamp my blog and get a half-decent theme.

I am currently in a committed love affair with Frank Turner's voice.

Jan 16
Guys I don’t think we talk about James Armistead Lafayette enough. Like seriously this guy deserves all the awards and I can’t believe a movie hasn’t been made about him. 
This guy, at age 21, got permission to leave his master’s plantation to join the Continental Army and fight in the American Revolution. The Marquis de Lafayette was impressed by his memory, so he sent him to spy on the camps of Benedict Arnold and General Cornwallis. He joined the British posing as a simple servant. He used the white generals’ racism against them, because they never noticed nor thought about the black server standing near when they worked out plans. 
Turns out, he was so damn good at his job that the British asked him to spy on the Americans. He became a double agent, giving the British fake information and Lafayette real information. Not just any information, mind you, but information that was vital to the victory at Yorktown. Only Armistead, of all the spies that were sent to Cornwallis, was able to get it. And through it all, ol’ Corny didn’t have a clue until he entered the revolutionaries’ headquarters only to see him standing next to Lafayette like the badass he was.
Unfortunately, because Virginia can be a load of dicks sometimes, after the war he was sent right back in to slavery. The Act of 1783 that freed slave soldiers was deemed not to apply to him because he was a spy. Well, when Lafayette heard of that, he had a very appropriate reaction of “What the actual hell, Virginia?” and sent a testimonial to the Virginia legislature in support of Armistead’s emancipation. By 1787, James Armistead was free, and changed his name to James Lafayette out of gratitude. 
This story has a happy ending, at least, because Armistead Lafayette got to spend the rest of his life living peacefully on a farm with his family, eventually complete with a $40 pension for his services. 

Guys I don’t think we talk about James Armistead Lafayette enough. Like seriously this guy deserves all the awards and I can’t believe a movie hasn’t been made about him. 

This guy, at age 21, got permission to leave his master’s plantation to join the Continental Army and fight in the American Revolution. The Marquis de Lafayette was impressed by his memory, so he sent him to spy on the camps of Benedict Arnold and General Cornwallis. He joined the British posing as a simple servant. He used the white generals’ racism against them, because they never noticed nor thought about the black server standing near when they worked out plans. 

Turns out, he was so damn good at his job that the British asked him to spy on the Americans. He became a double agent, giving the British fake information and Lafayette real information. Not just any information, mind you, but information that was vital to the victory at Yorktown. Only Armistead, of all the spies that were sent to Cornwallis, was able to get it. And through it all, ol’ Corny didn’t have a clue until he entered the revolutionaries’ headquarters only to see him standing next to Lafayette like the badass he was.

Unfortunately, because Virginia can be a load of dicks sometimes, after the war he was sent right back in to slavery. The Act of 1783 that freed slave soldiers was deemed not to apply to him because he was a spy. Well, when Lafayette heard of that, he had a very appropriate reaction of “What the actual hell, Virginia?” and sent a testimonial to the Virginia legislature in support of Armistead’s emancipation. By 1787, James Armistead was free, and changed his name to James Lafayette out of gratitude. 

This story has a happy ending, at least, because Armistead Lafayette got to spend the rest of his life living peacefully on a farm with his family, eventually complete with a $40 pension for his services. 


  1. chynnaj reblogged this from thebyanymeansnecessary
  2. thebyanymeansnecessary reblogged this from dazedclarity
  3. gandalfstruth reblogged this from dazedclarity
  4. marauderful reblogged this from dazedclarity
  5. thelasthairbender reblogged this from dazedclarity
  6. digitalvaudeville reblogged this from dazedclarity
  7. onnekaspolarnilisak reblogged this from dazedclarity
  8. chemman9 reblogged this from sewnafro
  9. nainakabirre reblogged this from sewnafro
  10. sewnafro reblogged this from dazedclarity
  11. hellokinkykacie reblogged this from dazedclarity
  12. auctor1881 reblogged this from dazedclarity
  13. swampertus reblogged this from dazedclarity
  14. xxcubanmafia reblogged this from dazedclarity
  15. thephunnymushroom reblogged this from sinus-supremas
  16. sinus-supremas reblogged this from thegypsypacifist
  17. i-cuntdothis reblogged this from ajsarevolution
  18. ajsarevolution reblogged this from thegypsypacifist
  19. thegypsypacifist reblogged this from dazedclarity
  20. iamkra reblogged this from virulentous
  21. virulentous reblogged this from peridottears
  22. vixtrix reblogged this from peridottears
  23. peridottears reblogged this from dazedclarity